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Reading from NOR flash is similar to reading from random-access memory, provided the address and data bus are mapped correctly. Because of this, most microprocessors can use NOR flash memory as execute in place (XIP) memory, meaning that programs stored in NOR flash can be executed directly from the NOR flash without needing to be copied into RAM first. NOR flash may be programmed in a random-access manner similar to reading. Programming changes bits from a logical one to a zero. Bits that are already zero are left unchanged. Erasure must happen a block at a time, and resets all the bits in the erased block back to one. Typical block sizes are 64, 128, or 256 KiB.
MultiMediaCard: Developed in 1997 by SanDisk and Siemens, MMCs were originally designed to use NAND flash memory technology from Toshiba. However, MMCs are less common with the arrival of SD card technology. Most computer hardware vendors no longer provide ports for inserting an MMC device. A new development is embedded MMC, or eMMC, in which the flash card is integrated on the computer motherboard along with controller software to use the eMMC as a bootable system drive. MMCs weigh approximately two grams.
The most prominent factor in choosing a memory card is what device you’ll be using it in. Most devices have a specific set of memory cards that are compatible with them. A smartphone or tablet may have only one slot, while a higher-end DSLR or mirrorless camera can have several. Check your device or owner’s manual, and take note of what formats you’ll be able to choose from.
Devices using flash memory erase data at the block level and rewrite data at the byte level — NOR flash — or multiple-byte page level — NAND flash. Flash memory is widely used for storage and data transfer in consumer devices, enterprise systems and industrial applications.
One more recent application for flash memory is as a replacement for hard disks. Flash memory does not have the mechanical limitations and latencies of hard drives, so a solid-state drive (SSD) is attractive when considering speed, noise, power consumption, and reliability. Flash drives are gaining traction as mobile device secondary storage devices; they are also used as substitutes for hard drives in high-performance desktop computers and some servers with RAID and SAN architectures.
The microSD removable miniaturized Secure Digital flash memory cards were originally named T-Flash or TF, abbreviations of TransFlash. TransFlash and microSD cards are functionally identical allowing either to operate in devices made for the other.[62] SanDisk had conceived microSD when its chief technology officer and the chief technology officer of Motorola concluded that current memory cards were too large for mobile phones. The card was originally called T-Flash, but just before product launch, T-Mobile sent a cease-and-desist order to SanDisk claiming that T-Mobile owned the trademark on T-(anything),[citation needed] and the name was changed to TransFlash. At CTIA Wireless 2005, the SDA announced the small microSD form factor along with SDHC secure digital high capacity formatting in excess of 2 GB with a minimum sustained read and write speed of 17.6 Mbit/s. SanDisk induced the SDA to administer the microSD standard. The SDA approved the final microSD specification on July 13, 2005. Initially, microSD cards were available in capacities of 32, 64, and 128 MB.
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Compatibility: CompactFlash CompactFlash UDMA 7 Secure Digital Secure Digital High Capacity (SDHC) Secure Digital High Capacity (SDHC UHS-1) Secure Digital eXtended Capacity (SDXC) Secure Digital eXtended Capacity (SDXC UHS-1) micro Secure Digital (microSD) micro Secure Digital eXtended Capacity (microSDXC) Memory Stick PRO Duo Memory Stick PRO HG
SD/SDHC/SDXC memory cards have a “Protected Area” on the card for the SD standard’s security function; a standard formatter may erase it, causing problems if security is used. The SD Association provides freely-downloadable SD Formatter software to overcome these problems for Windows and Mac OS X.[108] The SD Formatter does not format the “Protected Area”, and the Association recommends the use of appropriate application software or SD-compatible device that provides SD security function to format the “Protected Area” in the memory card.
In 1999, SanDisk, Matsushita, and Toshiba agreed to develop and market the Secure Digital (SD) Memory Card.[58] The card was derived from the MultiMediaCard (MMC) and provided digital rights management based on the Secure Digital Music Initiative (SDMI) standard and for the time, a high memory density.
In applications that require sustained write throughput, such as video recording, the device might not perform satisfactorily if the SD card’s class rating falls below a particular speed. For example, a high-definition camcorder may require a card of not less than Class 6, suffering dropouts or corrupted video if a slower card is used. Digital cameras with slow cards may take a noticeable time after taking a photograph before being ready for the next, while the camera writes the first picture.
However, SD is much more open than Memory Stick, for which no public documentation nor any documented legacy implementation is available. All SD cards can be accessed freely using the well-documented SPI bus.
Jump up ^ “8-Bit AVR Microcontroller ATmega32A Datasheet Complete” (PDF). 19 February 2016. p. 18. Archived from the original (PDF) on 9 April 2016. Retrieved 29 May 2016. Reliability Qualification results show that the projected data retention failure rate is much less than 1 PPM over 20 years at 85°C or 100 years at 25°C
Partnering with Nintendo in 1998, ArtX began the complete design of the system logic and of the graphics processor (codenamed “Flipper”)[9] of Nintendo’s sixth generation video game console, reportedly bearing the early internal code name of “N2000”.[10] At Nintendo’s press conference in May 1999, the console was first publicly announced as “Project Dolphin”, the successor to the Nintendo 64.[8][11] Subsequently, Nintendo began providing development kits to game developers. Nintendo also formed a strategic partnership with IBM for the production of Dolphin’s CPU, code-named “Gekko”.
Due to its relatively simple structure and high demand for higher capacity, NAND flash memory is the most aggressively scaled technology among electronic devices. The heavy competition among the top few manufacturers only adds to the aggressiveness in shrinking the design rule or process technology node.[31] While the expected shrink timeline is a factor of two every three years per original version of Moore’s law, this has recently been accelerated in the case of NAND flash to a factor of two every two years.
At under £10 this offers a Class 4 speed (4MB/s minimum) and more than enough storage for some holiday snaps with some videos as well. Kingston say all its cards are 100% tested and are backed by a lifetime warranty.
The “×” rating, that was used by some card manufacturers and made obsolete by speed classes, is a multiple of the standard CD-ROM drive speed of 150 KiB/s (approximately 1.23 Mbit/s). Basic cards transfer data at up to six times (6×) the CD-ROM speed; that is, 900 KiB/s or 7.37 Mbit/s. The 2.0 specification[clarification needed] defines speeds up to 200×, but is not as specific as Speed Classes are on how to measure speed. Manufacturers may report best-case speeds and may report the card’s fastest read speed, which is typically faster than the write speed. Some vendors, including Transcend and Kingston, report their cards’ write speed.[44] When a card lists both a speed class and an “×” rating, the latter may be assumed a read speed only.
Some prosumer and professional digital cameras continued to offer CompactFlash (CF), either on a second card slot or as the only storage, as CF supports much higher maximum capacities and historically was cheaper for the same capacity.
During transfer it may be in the range of 66–330 mW (20–100 mA at a supply voltage of 3.3 V). Specifications from TwinMos technologies list a maximum of 149 mW (45 mA) during transfer. Toshiba lists 264–330 mW (80–100 mA).[109] Standby current is much lower, less than 0.2 mA for one 2006 microSD card.[110] If there is data transfer for significant periods, battery life may be reduced noticeably (smartphones typically have batteries of capacity around 6 Wh (Samsung Galaxy S2, 1650 mAh @ 3.7 V)).
With early SD cards, a few card manufacturers specified the speed as a “times” (“×”) rating, which compared the average speed of reading data to that of the original CD-ROM drive. This was superseded by the Speed Class Rating, which guarantees a minimum rate at which data can be written to the card.[34]
The GameCube introduced a proprietary miniDVD optical disc format as the storage medium for the console, capable of storing up to 1.5 GB of data.[37] The technology was designed by Matsushita Electric Industrial (now Panasonic Corporation) which utilizes a proprietary copy-protection scheme – different from the Content Scramble System (CSS) found in standard DVDs – to prevent unauthorized reproduction.[38] The Famicom Data Recorder, Famicom Disk System, SNES-CD, and 64DD had explored various complementary storage technologies, but the GameCube was Nintendo’s first console to move away from cartridge-based media altogether.[39] The GameCube’s 1.5 GB mini-disc have sufficient room for most games, although a few games require an extra disc, higher video compression, or removal of content present in versions on other consoles. By comparison, the PlayStation 2 and Xbox, also sixth-generation consoles, both use 8.5 GB Dual-Layer DVDs.
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Version 5.0 was announced in February 2016 at CP+ 2016, and added “Video Speed Class” ratings for UHS cards to handle higher resolution video formats like 8K.[17][18] The new ratings define a minimum write speed of 90 MB/s.[19][20]
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To erase a NOR flash cell (resetting it to the “1” state), a large voltage of the opposite polarity is applied between the CG and source terminal, pulling the electrons off the FG through quantum tunneling. Modern NOR flash memory chips are divided into erase segments (often called blocks or sectors). The erase operation can be performed only on a block-wise basis; all the cells in an erase segment must be erased together. Programming of NOR cells, however, generally can be performed one byte or word at a time.
Speed class is a minimum sustained writing performance speed for SD cards. This means that it’s the speed it can write data to the card consistently. Speed class is mainly useful when you’re shopping for a card to use with video recording, since you’ll be continuously writing to the card. The higher the speed class, the more data you can write to the card in the same amount of time. Pay attention to this when deciding what card you need for the desired resolution you’d like to film in.
If you use a camera or cards that support faster UHS-II speeds, the Verbatim USB-C Pocket Card Reader is the reader you should buy. The Verbatim’s SD and microSD slots performed reliably and speedily—around 2.5 times faster than our top pick in our SD card read and write tests—and it has a slimmer design than most of the competition. Because of its very short cord, there’s no way to lay the device completely flat during data transfer, although you can neatly store the cord underneath the bottom of the reader when it’s not in use. It also lacks a CF slot and the handy indicator light that most of our other picks have. It comes with a one-year warranty.
With versatile capacities ranging from 8GB memory card, 16GB memory card, 32GB memory card, 64GB memory card and even 128GB, enjoy all the storage you will ever need for your movies, TV shows, music, documents, and more. And with class types extending across from Class 4, Class 6, to Class 10, for exceptional transfer read and write speeds, accessing your precious data quickly is truly effortless. Our deals also feature accessories that include card readers, USB hubs with card readers, OTG connectors, adapter sets, and more for the most complete memory card experience.
SD cards are also available in various speeds. If you’re using a point-and-shoot digital camera or a standard-definition pocket camcorder, speed class won’t matter much. If you’re shooting high-resolution RAW photos with a digital SLR, however, you need a quick card to take more than two or three shots at a time. SD cards are generally described by their Speed Class, ranging from Class 2 (slowest) to Class 10 (fastest). There’s also a separate, even faster category called UHS Class 1 (for Ultra High Speed), but most current devices can’t use them.
Read speed determines how fast data can be retrieved from the card. A faster read speed means you can more quickly transfer data from the card onto a computer or printer. Faster read speeds decrease your wait time so you can edit, save and share faster. For example, if you were shooting weddings, or doing work where you’d have to download a large amount of large raw image files to the computer, you’d want a higher read speed. However, read speed is really more of a convenience, whereas your primary focus should be write speed when you’re looking for a memory card.
Although Tripp Lite’s USB 3.1 USB-C Multi-Drive Flash Memory Media Reader has similar speeds to the Unitek, its microSD port suffers from the same misalignment as the one on our runner-up pick, it’s missing an indicator light, and it costs nearly twice as much as the Unitek.
Jump up ^ Yasufuku, Tadashi; Ishida, Koichi; Miyamoto, Shinji; Nakai, Hiroto; Takamiya, Makoto; Sakurai, Takayasu; Takeuchi, Ken (2009), Inductor design of 20-V boost converter for low power 3D solid state drive with NAND flash memories, pp. 87–92, archived from the original on 5 March 2016 (abstract).
Several manufacturers make microSD cards and they consume different amounts of electrical power. Most are in the range of 0-100 mA at a supply voltage of 3.3 V. TwinMos technologies says that the cards carry a maximum of 45 mA during transfer.[7] Toshiba lists 80-100 mA.[8]
The companies also formed the SD Association (SDA), a non-profit organization, in January 2000 to promote and create SD Card standards.[3] SDA today has about 1,000 member companies. The SDA uses several trademarked logos owned and licensed by SD-3C to enforce compliance with its specifications and assure users of compatibility.[4]
Compared to NOR flash, replacing single transistors with serial-linked groups adds an extra level of addressing. Whereas NOR flash might address memory by page then word, NAND flash might address it by page, word and bit. Bit-level addressing suits bit-serial applications (such as hard disk emulation), which access only one bit at a time. Execute-in-place applications, on the other hand, require every bit in a word to be accessed simultaneously. This requires word-level addressing. In any case, both bit and word addressing modes are possible with either NOR or NAND flash.
NAND relies on ECC to compensate for bits that may spontaneously fail during normal device operation. A typical ECC will correct a one-bit error in each 2048 bits (256 bytes) using 22 bits of ECC, or a one-bit error in each 4096 bits (512 bytes) using 24 bits of ECC.[43] If the ECC cannot correct the error during read, it may still detect the error. When doing erase or program operations, the device can detect blocks that fail to program or erase and mark them bad. The data is then written to a different, good block, and the bad block map is updated.
If you just bought a brand-new laptop and suddenly find yourself lacking a built-in SD reader, you may need a USB-C model. All of the latest MacBooks (including the 2016 and 2017 MacBook Pro models) have only USB-C ports, and no SD card readers. Some new Windows laptops exclusively use USB-C ports, too, and others have a mix of USB types and no built-in SD card slot.

Newegg is proud offer a wide variety of card readers: We offer the Compact Flash Card, Memory Stick Flash Card, Memory Stick Duo Flash Card, Memory Stick Pro Flash Card, Memory Stick Pro Duo Flash Card, Micro SDHC Flash Card, MicroSD Flash Card, Mini SDHC Flash Card, MiniSD Flash Card, MultiMedia Plus Flash Card, MultiMedia Micro Flash Card, SD DUO Flash Card, SD Plus USB Flash Card, SDHC Plus USB Flash Card, secure digital Flash Card, Secure Digital High-Capacity Flash Card and xD-Picture Flash Card. Find the card reader, flash memory, solid state disk or USB flash drive you need at Newegg.com, and enjoy the smoothest, most pleasurable online shopping experience you can find.
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Faster, more sophisticated cameras and camcorders, such as DSLR and mirrorless cameras, action cams, and even high-end point-and-shoot cameras have more capabilities that require different features from a memory card. HD, 4K Ultra HD, slow motion and high-speed burst shots require a lot faster speed and greater capacity from a memory card. To properly store these files, you’ll need cards with a higher write speed to keep up (see Write Speed below for more information). A memory card with higher write speeds will help prevent camera lag, recording failures and other performance issues. Larger memory card capacity will provide ample space for high-resolution photos and video so you won’t run out of memory when it matters most.

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