what does an sd card do | san cards

4 card slots support most xD-picture card, compactflash and secure digital and memory stick formats, including secure digital high capacity, SDXC, microSD, memory stick micro, memory stick PRO and memory stick duo
Reading from NOR flash is similar to reading from random-access memory, provided the address and data bus are mapped correctly. Because of this, most microprocessors can use NOR flash memory as execute in place (XIP) memory, meaning that programs stored in NOR flash can be executed directly from the NOR flash without needing to be copied into RAM first. NOR flash may be programmed in a random-access manner similar to reading. Programming changes bits from a logical one to a zero. Bits that are already zero are left unchanged. Erasure must happen a block at a time, and resets all the bits in the erased block back to one. Typical block sizes are 64, 128, or 256 KiB.
A flash memory chip is composed of NOR or NAND gates. NOR is a type of memory cell created by Intel in 1988. The NOR gate interface supports full addresses, data buses and random access to any memory location. The shelf life of NOR flash is 10,000 to 1,000,000 write/erase cycles.

Kingston Card Readers quickly transfer all your data – photos, videos, music etc.– so you can wait less and do more. They support a wide variety of formats, including microSD, microSDHC, SD, SDHC, SDXC and CompactFlash.
The nonprofit NVM Express Inc. is developing the NVMe over Fabrics industry specification to enable the NVMe storage interface to transfer data commands via Ethernet, FC, InfiniBand and other network fabrics.
Most SD cards ship preformatted with one or more MBR partitions, where the first or only partition contains a file system. This lets them operate like the hard disk of a personal computer. Per the SD card specification, an SD card is formatted with MBR and the following file system:
These two are linked by the design choices made in the development of NAND flash. A goal of NAND flash development was to reduce the chip area required to implement a given capacity of flash memory, and thereby to reduce cost per bit and increase maximum chip capacity so that flash memory could compete with magnetic storage devices like hard disks.[citation needed]
When capturing images and videos with your camera, camcorder, drone, or select mobile device, you may need a memory card. Memory cards act as storage for your devices, capturing photographs or even 4K Ultra HD video. The more complex your images or videos — such as shooting burst photographs, fast action shots or high-definition videos — the faster and larger your memory card needs to be. When shopping for the right memory card, you’ll want to make sure it is compatible, and has the capacity and speed to support your device.
Intel Corporation introduced the first commercial NOR type flash chip in 1988.[8] NOR-based flash has long erase and write times, but provides full address and data buses, allowing random access to any memory location. This makes it a suitable replacement for older read-only memory (ROM) chips, which are used to store program code that rarely needs to be updated, such as a computer’s BIOS or the firmware of set-top boxes. Its endurance may be from as little as 100 erase cycles for an on-chip flash memory,[9] to a more typical 10,000 or 100,000 erase cycles, up to 1,000,000 erase cycles.[10] NOR-based flash was the basis of early flash-based removable media; CompactFlash was originally based on it, though later cards moved to less expensive NAND flash.
In 1999, SanDisk, Matsushita, and Toshiba agreed to develop and market the Secure Digital (SD) Memory Card.[58] The card was derived from the MultiMediaCard (MMC) and provided digital rights management based on the Secure Digital Music Initiative (SDMI) standard and for the time, a high memory density.
After a new round of research and testing, we found that the Unitek USB-C Card Reader is the best USB-C SD card reader for most people. Our previous pick, the Iogear USB-C 3-Slot Card Reader, is now our runner-up. We have a new, less-expensive UHS-II SD reader recommendation, the Verbatim USB-C Pocket Card Reader, and our budget and USB-A picks remain the same.
Many ASICs are pad-limited, meaning that the size of the die is constrained by the number of wire bond pads, rather than the complexity and number of gates used for the device logic. Eliminating bond pads thus permits a more compact integrated circuit, on a smaller die; this increases the number of dies that may be fabricated on a wafer, and thus reduces the cost per die.
The GameCube is the first Nintendo console to use optical discs as its primary storage medium. The discs are similar to the miniDVD format; as a result of their smaller size and the console’s small disc compartment, the system was not designed to play standard DVDs or audio CDs. The console supports online gaming for a small number of games via the broadband or modem adapter and connects to the Game Boy Advance via the link cable, allowing players to access exclusive in-game features using the handheld as a second screen and controller.
The trademarked SD logo was originally developed for the Super Density Disc, which was the unsuccessful Toshiba entry in the DVD format war. For this reason the D within the logo resembles an optical disc.
Howard Cheng, technical director of Nintendo technology development, said the company’s goal was to select a “simple RISC architecture” to help speed development of games by making it easier on software developers. IGN reported that the system was “designed from the get-go to attract third-party developers by offering more power at a cheaper price. Nintendo’s design doc for the console specifies that cost is of utmost importance, followed by space.”[10] Hardware partner ArtX’s Vice President Greg Buchner stated that their guiding thought on the console’s hardware design was to target the developers rather than the players, and to “look into a crystal ball” and discern “what’s going to allow the Miyamoto-sans of the world to develop the best games”.[7]
A big bright blue indicator light makes life easier, lighting up when connected to your computer and flashing when accessed. We used it on a laptop with Windows 7 to access a 1 Gb micro SD card that…. wait for it…. had been horribly and evilly, and quite accidentally drowned in the washing machine (Mr. Mr. doesn’t know how to check his pants pockets when I’m screaming ‘Hurry up already!’… obviously all his fault!), and it worked flawlessly with the tiny drowned card! Whew! Phone dead. Info saved!
Kingston offers Flash drives designed for and certified by Microsoft® for use with Windows® To Go. A feature of Windows 8 Enterprise, Windows to Go lets IT administrators provide mobile and contingency workers with secure access to the corporate environment.
TransFlash and microSD cards are the same (they can be used in place of each other), but microSD has support for SDIO mode. This lets microSD slots support non-memory jobs like Bluetooth, GPS, and Near Field Communication by attaching a device in place of a memory card.[3]
Jump up ^ Masuoka, F.; Momodomi, M.; Iwata, Y.; Shirota, R. (1987). “New ultra high density EPROM and flash EEPROM with NAND structure cell”. Electron Devices Meeting, 1987 International. IEEE. Archived from the original on 14 May 2013. Retrieved 4 January 2013.
NOR flash is fast on data reads, but it is typically slower than NAND on erases and writes. NOR flash programs data at the byte level. NAND flash programs data in pages, which are larger than bytes, but smaller than blocks. For instance, a page might be 4 kilobytes (KB), while a block might be 128 KB to 256 KB or megabytes in size. NAND flash consumes less power than NOR flash for write-intensive applications.
By the time the version 2.0 (SDHC) specification was completed in June 2006,[112] vendors had already devised 2 GB and 4 GB SD cards, either as specified in Version 1.01, or by creatively reading Version 1.00. The resulting cards do not work correctly in some host devices.[113][114]
Early versions of the SD specification were available only after agreeing to a non-disclosure agreement (NDA) that prohibited development of an open source driver. However, the system was eventually reverse-engineered, and free software drivers provided access to SD cards that did not use DRM. Since then, the SDA has provided a simplified version of the specification under a less restrictive license.[115] Although most open-source drivers were written before this, it has helped to solve compatibility issues.
Flash dual inline memory module (DIMM), otherwise known as memory channel solid-state storage, which exploits idle DIMM DRAM slots as low-latency, high-performance flash cache to buffer host server performance.
Official pin numbers for each card type (top to bottom): MMC, SD, miniSD, microSD. This shows the evolution from the older MMC, on which SD is based. NOTE: This drawing doesn’t show 8 new UHS-II contacts that were added in spec 4.0.
Cards that comply with UHS show Roman numerals ‘I’, ‘II’ or ‘III’ next to the SD card logo,[27][34] and report this capability to the host device. Use of UHS-I requires that the host device command the card to drop from 3.3-volt to 1.8-volt operation over the I/O interface pins and select the four-bit transfer mode, while UHS-II requires 0.4-volt operation.
On April 22, 2002, veteran third party Nintendo console developer Factor 5 announced its 3D audio software development kit for GameCube developers, MusyX. In collaboration with Dolby Laboratories, it provides motion-based surround sound encoded as Dolby Pro Logic II.[32]
As the feature size of flash memory cells reaches the 15-16 nm minimum limit, further flash density increases will be driven by TLC (3 bits/cell) combined with vertical stacking of NAND memory planes. The decrease in endurance and increase in uncorrectable bit error rates that accompany feature size shrinking can be compensated by improved error correction mechanisms.[84] Even with these advances, it may be impossible to economically scale flash to smaller and smaller dimensions as the number of electron holding capacity reduces. Many promising new technologies (such as FeRAM, MRAM, PMC, PCM, ReRAM, and others) are under investigation and development as possible more scalable replacements for flash.[85]
Support – Compact Flash: CF I / CF I Pro / CF I Pro II / CF I Elite Pro / CF I ultra II / Shoot & Store CF / CF II / CF II Magicstor/ CF II Ultimate/ CF-Digital Film/ CF 3.0 / CF4.0 / EXTREME III CF / EXTREME CF / ULTRA II CF / HS CF / XS-XS CF / CF ELITE PRO / CF PRO / CF PRO II / IBM MD / HITACHI MD / MAGIC STOR MD
MicroSD cards, which are used in most cell phones and smartphones, are downright Lilliputian, measuring 15 by 11 by 1 mm (HWD) and weighing only half a gram. With a total volume of 165 mm3, you could fit nine microSD cards inside a single SD card (though realistically, with the slight lip found on the end of microSD cards, you could probably only squeeze in six).
The WEme card reader offers SD and CF support, but it’s actually a USB-A reader that ships with a USB-C-to-A adapter. We think you’re better off using our best USB-A reader with our best USB-C–to–A adapter.
The Iogear is about an inch skinnier and a half inch longer than the Unitek, measuring in at 3 by 1.6 by 0.5 inches. Although it’s technically shorter and lighter than the Unitek, its rounded top makes it appear bulkier. It also has a shiny black body that attracts fingerprints, and a short, 4.3-inch connecting cable attached to its back.
The speed class rating does not totally characterize card performance. Different cards of the same class may vary considerably while meeting class specifications. A card’s speed depends on many factors, including:
The SD Standard allows usage of only the above-mentioned Microsoft FAT file systems and any card produced in the market shall be preloaded with the related standard file system upon its delivery to the market. If any application or user re-formats the card with a non-standard file system the proper operation of the card, including interoperability, cannot be assured.
Jump up ^ Jonathan Thatcher, Fusion-io; Tom Coughlin, Coughlin Associates; Jim Handy, Objective-Analysis; Neal Ekker, Texas Memory Systems (April 2009). “NAND Flash Solid State Storage for the Enterprise, An In-depth Look at Reliability” (PDF). Solid State Storage Initiative (SSSI) of the Storage Network Industry Association (SNIA). Archived (PDF) from the original on 14 October 2011. Retrieved 6 December 2011.
Consumer flash storage devices typically are advertised with usable sizes expressed as a small integer power of two (2, 4, 8, etc.) and a designation of megabytes (MB) or gigabytes (GB); e.g., 512 MB, 8 GB. This includes SSDs marketed as hard drive replacements, in accordance with traditional hard drives, which use decimal prefixes.[60] Thus, an SSD marked as “64 GB” is at least 64 × 10003 bytes (64 GB). Most users will have slightly less capacity than this available for their files, due to the space taken by file system metadata.
Another memory card type used in top-end professional cameras and camcorders is CFast. A variant of CompactFlash, this memory card format has an extremely fast write speed and can be used in cameras that capture the highest quality images and video.
In 2008, the SDA specified Embedded SD, “leverag[ing] well-known SD standards” to enable non-removable SD-style devices on printed circuit boards.[98] However this standard was not adopted by the market while the MMC standard became the de facto standard for embedded systems. SanDisk provides such embedded memory components under the iNAND brand.[99]

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