nano sd card | memory card reader for camera

NAND was developed by Toshiba a year after NOR was produced. It is faster, has a lower cost per bit, requires less chip area per cell and has added resilience. The shelf life of a NAND gate is approximately 100,000 write/erase cycles. In NOR gate flash every cell has an end connected to a bit line and the other end connected to a ground. If a word line is “high” then the transistor proceeds to lower the output bit line.
Dr. Fujio Masuoka is credited with the invention of flash memory when he worked for Toshiba in the 1980s. Masuoka’s colleague, Shoji Ariizumi, reportedly coined the term flash because the process of erasing all the data from a semiconductor chip reminded him of the flash of a camera.
These cards are each pre-packed in a certified Frustration Free Packaging (FFP) mailer labelled Amazon/SanDisk (No. 80-56-10641), and then shipped in a bubble wrap envelope which was 11.25″ x 9″. The bubble envelope seemed too big, but perhaps that size was necessary to accommodate the huge shipping label. I will post some pictures of the package and card.
A flash memory chip is composed of NOR or NAND gates. NOR is a type of memory cell created by Intel in 1988. The NOR gate interface supports full addresses, data buses and random access to any memory location. The shelf life of NOR flash is 10,000 to 1,000,000 write/erase cycles.
Flash memory stores information in an array of memory cells made from floating-gate transistors. In single-level cell (SLC) devices, each cell stores only one bit of information. Multi-level cell (MLC) devices, including triple-level cell (TLC) devices, can store more than one bit per cell.
Most SD cards are 2.1 mm (0.083 inches) thick, compared to 1.4 mm (0.055 inches) for MMCs. The SD specification defines a card called Thin SD with a thickness of 1.4 mm, but they occur only rarely, as the SDA went on to define even smaller form factors.
Flash memory evolved from erasable programmable read-only memory (EPROM) and electrically erasable programmable read-only memory (EEPROM). Flash is technically a variant of EEPROM, but the industry reserves the term EEPROM for byte-level erasable memory and applies the term flash memory to larger block-level erasable memory.
Micron Technology and Intel Corp. have previewed a form of storage-class memory known as 3D XPoint (pronounced “cross point”). The vendors said they will produce flash drives that store 128 GB across two stacked layers of flash memory. 3D XPoint reportedly would be approximately 1,000 times faster than NAND flash, 1,000 times more enduring than DRAM and provide 10 times the storage density of existing NAND flash-based SSDs when it hits the market.
The GameCube launched in Japan on September 14, 2001.[27] Approximately 500,000 units were shipped in time to retailers.[28] The console was scheduled to launch two months later in North America on November 5, 2001, but the date was pushed back in an effort to increase the number of available units.[29] The console eventually launched in North America on November 18, 2001, with over 700,000 units shipped to the region.[30] Other regions followed suit the following year beginning with Europe in the second quarter of 2002.[31]
The SD/MicroSD/MMC Card Reader/Writer is a solution for hi-speed, bi-directional image and data transfer. Images and data can be transferred quickly from Secure Digital Card (SD), MultiMedia Card (MMC), or MicroSD memory cards to PCs or Macs. This is particularly useful in many applications, including digital cameras, video cameras, mobile phones, MP3, and other mobile devices. This item is an ideal way to bridge the gap between your desktop computer and other CE products.
When executing software from NAND memories, virtual memory strategies are often used: memory contents must first be paged or copied into memory-mapped RAM and executed there (leading to the common combination of NAND + RAM). A memory management unit (MMU) in the system is helpful, but this can also be accomplished with overlays. For this reason, some systems will use a combination of NOR and NAND memories, where a smaller NOR memory is used as software ROM and a larger NAND memory is partitioned with a file system for use as a non-volatile data storage area.
PC Cards (PCMCIA) were the first commercial memory card formats (type I cards) to come out, but are now mainly used in industrial applications and to connect I/O devices such as modems. Since 1994, a number of memory card formats smaller than the PC Card arrived, the first one was CompactFlash and later SmartMedia and Miniature Card. The desire for smaller cards for cell-phones, PDAs, and compact digital cameras drove a trend that left the previous generation of “compact” cards looking big. In digital cameras SmartMedia and CompactFlash had been very successful[neutrality is disputed]. In 2001, SM alone captured 50% of the digital camera market and CF had captured the professional digital camera market. By 2005 however, SD/MMC had nearly taken over SmartMedia’s spot, though not to the same level and with stiff competition coming from Memory Stick variants, as well CompactFlash. In industrial and embedded fields, even the venerable PC card (PCMCIA) memory cards still manage to maintain a niche, while in mobile phones and PDAs, the memory card has become smaller.
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Jump up ^ “AMD DL160 and DL320 Series Flash: New Densities, New Features” (PDF). AMD. July 2003. Archived (PDF) from the original on 24 September 2015. Retrieved 13 November 2014. The devices offer single-power-supply operation (2.7 V to 3.6 V), sector architecture, Embedded Algorithms, high performance, and a 1,000,000 program/erase cycle endurance guarantee.
Compatibility: Supporting Media List: SD/SDHC: SD, SDHC, SDXC, MicroSDXC, SD-Pro, SD-Pleomax, SD-Pro C, Ultra II SD, Ultra II Plus SD, SD-Extreme III, SD-Ultra X, SD-Turbo, SD-Supper, SD Max, Mini SD, Mini SD-Pro, Mini SD-Pleomax, MMC, MMC-Pleomax, MMC Pro, HS-MMC, MMC Plus, MMC-Plus Turbo, RS MMC, RS MMC-Pleomax, RS MMC-Speed, RS MMC-Max, MMC Mobile, MMC Mobile-ProC, MMC Mobile-Pocketnet, MMC Micro* microSD / microSDHC: microSD / microSDHC, T-Flash * Adapter required.
Dave, thanks.  There wasn’t an item as you suggested under “disk drives” – but after rebooting the notebook with the SD Card inserted,  I can now see an SD Host Adaptor (“SDA Standard Compliant SD Host Controller”). 
In our SD card test, the Unitek had read and write speeds of 92 MB/s and 85 MB/s respectively, which is about what we expect for our test SD card on a UHS-I connection. When reading and writing to the microSD card, it had speeds of 92 MB/s and 70 MB/s, and in our CF card test, the Unitek had read and write speeds of 154 MB/s and 144 MB/s, respectively. (These speeds also matched our expectations.) It can also read two cards simultaneously, although we noticed a significant drop in performance: Running an SD and a microSD card at the same time gave us read and write speeds of 59 MB/s and 49 MB/s, respectively. But otherwise the Unitek worked as it should, which isn’t something we can say about many of the card readers we tested.

SDXC cards utilize the exFAT file system, the use of which is governed by a proprietary license, thereby limiting its legal availability to a small set of operating systems. Therefore, exFAT-formatted SDXC cards are not a universally readable exchange medium.
Electronic devices have delivered incredible convenience and freedom, however storage remains a crucial aspect of the digital experience. Built-in storage capacity is a hard limit on what’s possible, but this can now be extended with an external (removable) memory card. These are generally referred to as sd memory card, Mini SD, SDXC, TF card or microSD card, however the standard term remains memory card. These are essential for a vast range of devices including mobile phones, tablets, cameras, PSP, notebooks, and more. GearBest delivers a comprehensive selection of the very latest flash memory card deals to keep your data secure and you connected to a world of multimedia and files.
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A card’s read speed describes how fast data can be retrieved from a card. This performance is seen when transferring card contents to computers and printers for example. A faster read speed will transfer images to your computer more rapidly also (depending on how the SD card is wired up to the computer, as a direct connection vs USB 2 vs FireWire 800 vs USB 3 will make a significant difference also, as will, potentially, your hard disk or SSD storage memory speed).
Consumer-grade solid-state drives (SSDs) embed silicon-based memory chips as storage media for persistent storage of data. The earliest SSDs were generally designed for consumer devices. The debut of the Apple iPod in 2005 marked the first notable flash-based device to broadly penetrate the consumer market. SanDisk has a line of portable SSDs that scale to 1.92 terabytes (TB) of flash capacity; they are marketed mainly for flash storage of digital photography.
Home consoles now commonly use hard disk drive storage for saved games and allow the use of generic USB flash drives or other card formats via a memory card reader to transport game saves and other game information, along with cloud storage saving, though most portable gaming systems still rely on custom memory cartridges to store program data, due to their low power consumption, smaller physical size and reduced mechanical complexity.
Jump up ^ “Samsung Electronics Launches the World’s First PCs with NAND Flash-based Solid State Disk”. Press Release. Samsung. 24 May 2006. Archived from the original on 20 December 2008. Retrieved 30 November 2008.
In addition to flash memory arrays, the ability to insert SSDs in x86-based servers has increased the technology’s popularity. This arrangement is known as server-side flash memory and it enables companies to sidestep the vendor lock-in associated with purchasing expensive and integrated flash storage arrays.
Size is probably the next biggest consideration when shopping SD memory cards. Think about how you take pictures. Do you like to go a long time in between downloads to your computer? Do you shoot with the RAW file format? Does your camera have a high megapixel count? If you answered “yes” to any of these questions, you might need a large SD card of 32GB or more. If not, a smaller SD card may meet your needs.
Flash memory (both NOR and NAND types) was invented by Fujio Masuoka while working for Toshiba circa 1980.[4][5] According to Toshiba, the name “flash” was suggested by Masuoka’s colleague, Shōji Ariizumi, because the erasure process of the memory contents reminded him of the flash of a camera.[6] Masuoka and colleagues presented the invention at the IEEE 1987 International Electron Devices Meeting (IEDM) held in San Francisco.[7]
Application Performance Class is a newly defined standard from the SD Specification 5.1 and 6.0 which not only define sequential Reading Speeds but also mandates a minimum IOPS for reading and writing. Class A1 requires a minimum of 1500 reading and 500 writing operations per second, while class A2 requires 4000 and 2000 IOPS.[43]
The Kingston had read and write speeds of 159 MB/s and 127 MB/s, respectively, during our SD card test. In our microSD card test, it had expected read and write speeds of 83 MB/s and 69 MB/s. It was a bit slower when reading and writing to a CF card, with speeds of 127 MB/s and 107 MB/s.
Jump up ^ Kim, Kinam; Koh, Gwan-Hyeob (16 May 2004). Future Memory Technology including Emerging New Memories (PDF). Serbia and Montenegro: Proceedings of the 24th International Conference on Microelectronics. pp. 377–384. Retrieved 2008-08-15.

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